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PBS
Nov 5, 2012 2:30pm PST
new book is called forget about today. we are glad you joined us for a look health care and the influence of bob dylan coming up now. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> the california endowment happens in neighborhoods. learn now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. eric topol has shared the department of the cleveland clinic. he has directed the transitional science institute's and is the ok.hor of the new boat it is great to have you on the program. >> thank you. >> how will the digital revolution creates a better health care? >> you are used to digitize books and music. how about people? we can get through sequencing once genome. basically everything fed makes you take -- that makes you tick we can change medicine. tavis: give me exam
PBS
Nov 21, 2012 7:00pm PST
at a chicago toys r us. manager danny soro thinks up to 10,000 shoppers will descend on the store when it opens thanksgiving evening, forcing his 300 employees to cut short their holiday. >> we open at 8:00 and we're expecting lines to start from 5 pm to go pretty much throughout the plaza. >> reporter: walmart, kmart, and sears are also opening tomorrow at 8pm; target's opening at 9:00pm. and while opening on turkey day is expected to mean big business for retailers, it's ruffling the feathers of many employees who won't get paid overtime to work the holiday. >> i feel very frustrated about this situation. >> reporter: walmart associate charmaine givens is scheduled to work two eight hour shifts with a three hour break starting tomorrow at 7 pm. >> i'm not gonna do that, no. >> reporter: you're just not going to show up? >> i'm going to call in. i'm gonna call in. i'm not going to just abandon the job. i'm gonna call in and i'm gonna state how i feel. >> reporter: givens hopes to join other walmart employees around the country in a protest outside the chain on friday. pro-labor g
PBS
Nov 30, 2012 3:00pm PST
buster, a tactic used to delay legislation but republicans say the tool is key to protecting their minority rights. >> warner: on the eve of world aids day, ray suarez updates the hopes and frustrations in the fight against the deadly disease. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> warner: and is the grand canyon 60 million years older than we've long thought? we ask science correspondent miles o'brien. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've been ke
PBS
Nov 23, 2012 2:30pm PST
. cities and has been seen by more than 3 million people. we are glad you have joined us. our conversation with bernard and shirley kinsey coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: bernard and shirley kinsey are behind the unique art exhibit. the kinsey collection has been viewed by 3 million people in eight u.s. cities, with more on the way, beginning in 2013. the companion book to the exhibit is called "the kinsey collection." it is an honor to have you both on this program. >> good to be here. tavis: let me start with whether or not in the obama era a door has been at open for greater appreciation of african-american art. i ask that for the obvious reasons, bec
PBS
Nov 5, 2012 4:00pm PST
states to visit. president obama uses the final hours to campaign for every vote he can. >> after all we've been through together, we can't give up now. because we've got more change to do. >> his rival, mitt romney, traveled to four states to make his final pitch for a change in the white house. >> you hoped that president obama would live up to his promise to bring people together and to solve problem. he hasn't. i will. >> and if you live here, the election is secondary. a week after sandy blew through in new york neighborhood, it's still waiting for help. welcome to our viewers on public television in america. and also around the globe. for those of you despairing that this presidential election has gone on far too long, good news. it's almost over. the final day of campaigning saw the candidates flying across the country in a last bid for votes. tonight we have comprehensive coverage of how the campaign looks at the very end. the bbc north american editor has been with the obama campaign in wisconsin. he starts our coverage. >> win or lose, it's the last time he'll campaign to sa
PBS
Nov 26, 2012 12:00pm PST
exploring our brain with the conversation about pain. pain serves a very important function for us to survive, it teaches us what to avoid and lets us know when to seek medical help. at the same time, though it can create tremendous suffering. st. augustine once said the greatest evil is physical pain, 100 million americans live with it every day would yo would wouo doubt agree, pain knows no boundaries, regardless of age and race, beyond the physical symptoms the experience of chronic pain often leads to feelings of isolation and hopelessness. >> laura klein had been living with pain since a knee injury in 2008 and joins me this evening to speak about her experiences and incredible group of scientists are also here to discuss how we perceive and process pain, david bar stiewk of children's hospital and david julius of the university of california, san francisco, allan basbaum, also of the university of california san francisco, robert dworkin of the university of rochester and once again my cohost dr. eric kandel a nobel laureate, and a howard hughes medical investigator. >> our subj
PBS
Nov 10, 2012 1:30am PST
us what was it like. were people surprised at the close, the short drama? >> well, you know, belva, we were in the snoechs the snoeno hampshire, you know how dramatic it was all the way through. just amazing to be there on that final night. this was a much different election night than 2008, when 250,000 people greeted this sort of landmark moment. barack obama is more weathered, he's -- >> belva: graying. >> graying, but boy, the -- the democrats there, it was just pandemonium. and i think -- this time, it was tears of relief. instead of joy. that this contest has been so tough, so expensive and so important in so many ways and we saw it so negative that i think people are glad it's over, but to be there and to watch the president give that address and we heard him today in washington talking about what happens now in this country. i think the republicans learned from this election, what we saw in this election, we've seen in california decades before. the ethnic vote, the latino vote, the youth vote, the women's vote. this is -- this has been an electorate that's made a differenc
PBS
Nov 1, 2012 1:00am PDT
knocked down the financial district. us stock markets resumed operations today after two days in the dark, stocks were little changed: both the dow and the nasdaq fell 10 points, but the s&p 500 gained a fraction. trading here at the new york stock exchange opened without a hitch. the new york stock exchange opened right on time. and as new york's mayor bloomberg rang the opening bell this morning, traders were happy to be back to work. it looked like a normal day, with the buzz of activity, traders milling about. it was anything but normal no one knows that better than larry leibowitz, the head of the nyse's floor operations. he's has been working with the exchange's staff for four straight days, and he even slept in his office last night to make sure the big board would be up and running today. >> we and the rest of the market are in great shape. it's surprising, almost surprising how great shape not just us but the rest of the market is, given how much potential disruption there was. >> reporter: still the internet and cell phones were not working. many traders rely on their cell
PBS
Nov 1, 2012 3:00pm PDT
economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in life and property kept growing today, in the wake of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other waterside cities. the massive force of the storm's destruction along the jersey shore came fully into view today. town after town presented stark scenes of wrecked homes and boats, underscoring the long process of rebuilding that lies ahead. one of those towns was the long beach community north of atlantic city, where army national guard troops arrived to assist. >> a lot of devastation. the island has been hit very hard. from what i understand there is roughly 18,000 homes without power, there is severe gas leaks, so right now we are just trying to get everything together for th
PBS
Nov 20, 2012 12:00pm PST
qaeda still posed a threat, a different threat from the one that we were used to with bin laden but a threat nonetheless, i think the answer increasingly yes s yes. they didn't want the public to see that effort as anything other than a great success. that was part of obama's appeal. so i'd say on the particular details, i don't see much. on the broad theme, did they want the public to feel al qaeda was down for the count? yes, i think they did. >> rose: we conclude with julian sands, a british actor, talking about harold pinter, the english playwright and nobel laureate. >> in comparison with harold, other people looked blurred because he was such a life force. he was so present. he was so forceful. and he lived by pure intention. >> rose: aluf, david ignatius and julian sands when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin with attacks by israel and hamas. in israel, three civilians have been killed and dozens wounded, hamas has fired more than one thousand rockets into israel, many of which hav
PBS
Nov 16, 2012 4:00pm PST
use to downgrade relations. >> how has the arab spring it changed the dynamic? >> i think that has made it a lot more pressing for arab leaders. the arab leaders have to be more responsive to their publics rhetorically and also in terms of what they do. arab publics are very supportive of the palestinian cause, but it is on these new leaders to behave responsibility and understand consequences for their actions. for egypt, it is a board to reinforce to egypt leaders the treaty with israel create stability and makes egypt's a good investment. outt's very diplomatic way of the crisis? that at the moment, it seems that both hamas and aerial are committed to see this through. -- at the moment it seems that both hamas and israel are committed to see this through. newmembers of syria's opposition coalition are seeking former role recognition of the west and held talks in london. it said they still needed to submit plans for a political solution. it said britain would offer its support. our diplomatic correspondent has the latest. >> a regime bombing run in northern syria. this act of thi
PBS
Nov 14, 2012 12:00pm PST
well but he allowed paula broadwell all of this access. all of us had access to general petraeus over the years when he wants us around and tell us something. but this was different. he really allowed her to go everywhere with him. he talked to her all the time. i've talked to many aides, they were concerned about it in afghanistan. they were concerned how it looked, the optics of having this woman all the time. they described her as gushy and inappropriate talking about his thoughts. you've seen her on several programs over the last week. and things she was saying about him. that made them uncomfortable. >> well like martha, i've known him for about a decade, covered him in these war jones. he's a disciplined man, a man with incredible force of will. as much as we talk about his counterinsurgency doctrine, when i think about what happened in iraq, it was really david petraeus' will power in that battle space in the way he changed people's expectations what was possible, what was striking. so to see a man of that intensity get involved with another very intense person paula broadwell,
PBS
Nov 22, 2012 12:00pm PST
an operating system for your smart phones? use the android. and it's a very good operating system. so they have it. and google says what are we going to get out of that? they said in the short term we're obviously -- google search is going to be prominent on those smart phones and our search growth will rise and it has, by the way, they've grown because mobile -- >> rose: they've got a huge lead. >> 70% almost. a. b, they say at some point as they did to figure out how to make money in 2001, at some point we'll come up with a way to monetize this. that is the same view that mark zuckerberg has at facebook. we're going to put it out. we've got a billion people, a billion users on facebook, we'll figure out a way, just as google did in 2001 with ad words and ad sense, those little ads on the right-hand side that generate over $40 billion a year. and we'll figure out a way to do it. and, you know, will they? you know, maybe. and maybe not. but with that mass audience there's a good chance they will. >> rose: here's what's interesting to me. they're getting in each other's businesses.
PBS
Nov 4, 2012 5:00pm PST
of stock broker, saw something happened before it reached the mainstream. before the rest of us knew what hit us. that little speech about the richest 1% of the demise of democracy proved to be prophetic. flesh and blood americans are living now every day with the consequences -- >> my name is amanda greubel. i am 32 years old, born and raised in iowa. i've been married for ten years today to my high school sweetheart, josh. he's the high school band director of the same district where i am the family resource center director. we have a five-year old son benen, and our second child on the way in december, like a lot of american families we have a lot of debt. mortgage, two vehicle, and because we both have master's degrees a lot of student loan debt. >> amanda was invited to testify last summeralt a senate hearing on how americans are coping in hard times. when the state cut funding for local school districts, amanda and her husband feared they might lose their jobs. at the same minute, they were spared although her salary was reduced by $10,000. >> $10,000 might not seem like a
PBS
Nov 24, 2012 2:00am PST
economic recovery? joining us this thanksgiving week, peter baker of "the new york times." molly ball of "the atlantic." and jim tankersly of "national journal." >> award winning reporting and analysis. covering history as it happe. from our nationas capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factories. to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe the people of boeing are working together. to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875, we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. when their needs changed, we were there to meet them. through the years, from insurance to investment management, from real estate to retirement solutions, we've developed new ideas for the financial challenges ahead. this rock has never stood still. and that's one thing th
PBS
Nov 16, 2012 7:00pm PST
some consensus to do the peoples business. and what folks are looking for-- and i think all of us agree on this-- is action. >> reporter: speaker pelosi suggested the leaders agree on milestones that will bolster the economy. >> we should have a goal in terms of how much deficit reduction. we should have a deadline before christmas. we should show some milestones of success so that confidence can build as we reach our solution. >> reporter: over the last week markets had grown increasingly pessimistic about avoiding the fiscal cliff. today's tone provided some relief, but it's clear major hurdles remain. >> how much do rates have to go up? what can republicans accept on that and what can the democrats accept in terms of structural reform of entitlements? i think those are the two big sticking points and those are going to remain the sticking points. and if you can figure out what's going to happen there, you can figure out whether there is going to be a deal and when that deal might happen. >> serious negotiating begins after thanksgiving. susie. >> susie: you know, darren, you ta
PBS
Nov 15, 2012 12:00am PST
' contributions to his country, and also said-- i'm not sure the exact word he used-- but basically no top vent intelligence was revealed. >> i think he made a point of saying so far. and so far, there is not any negative effect on national security. but this investigation is clearly still open. you have hagents going into paula broadwell's house, taking out boxes, taking out her computer. they are still looking for classified material. whatever too soon maybe it was something for the book. maybe it's a schedule that's classified. you know how this works. everything in the military is practically classified including weather reports. i've sat through briefings and it's classified. in terms of it being illegal, if she has classified material in her home, it is illegal. now, she had a clearance. she could read classified material, but not in her home. they've now yanked her security clearance we just learned this evening while this investigation continues. but she shouldn't have had classified material. i think what they're talking about is in terms of so far, they haven't seen, you know, pi
PBS
Nov 7, 2012 3:00pm PST
and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >> reporter: mr. obama departed his hometown of chicago this afternoon for washington, his home for another four years. waiting for him: a still- divided congress now facing a critical lame duck sess
PBS
Nov 9, 2012 8:00pm PST
puzzle. how did they put it together? >> they had multiple paths to get to 270. they used almost all of them. they were able to through very focused data-driven ground operation identify their voters and successfully reassemble the coalition that they had in 2008. african americans, latino, -- latinos, young voters, women. would young voters turn out in the numbers they did before? in fact, they were by one point a higher percentage than they were in 2008. would african americans vote with the same enthusiasm compared to 2008? they did. it was 15%. this was a campaign that set its sights early and improving on what everybody thought was a very good ground operation and they exceeded it. gwen: in a very specific way, not in a broad base at all and not in a way that was out to persuade anyone who had not voted for them before. >> it was not much of a persuasion. they started with the baseline of the 2008 results. and then they had the census from 2010. they saw what had changed and who had moved around. and then it's the sole reason that jim mussina moved to chicago and started buildin
PBS
Nov 21, 2012 6:00pm PST
been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: after another day of violence, a ceasefire deal between israel and hamas was finally announced in cairo today. but further negotiations on key longer-term sticking points between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt has exerted efforts and conducted intensive discussions since the renewed outbreak of hostilities in the gaza strip with all parties: the palestinian leadership, the these efforts and communications managed to reach an agreement to a ceasefire and the return of calm and halt of the violence and the bloodshed that was witnessed recently. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a ceasefire in gaza. for it
PBS
Nov 11, 2012 5:00pm PST
, "you are not going to take the vote away from us." some people stood in line for six, seven and eight hours. some had been in areas that had been damaged by the storm. and i just think that they were there upholding democracy. so that's the first thing that i remember about it. >> they were also there making delicious pecan tarts. because when i voted, the kids in the school were selling baking goods, and they were having a great time of it. what will you remember? >> oh, that's a tough one to say. i think that for a lot of conservatives and a lot of republicans this was a very disappointing election that opened a lot of folks' eyes to some of the deeper changes that have happened in the country, much more so in some respects than the 2008 election -- which i think a lot of folks wrote off as a one off, as a fluke, something that reflected very unique historical circumstances. but i think this election really did demonstrate that there's been a dramatic change, particularly with regard to social issues and how folks talk about them. so i think that that has proven very sobering alread
PBS
Nov 3, 2012 12:00am PDT
with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this question what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know what we consider the book today is a relatively recent historical phenomenon. i totally disagree that homer would recognize the book. you know actually we probably more recognize the ebook. >> rose: hurricane sandy, politics and publishing when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this has been a difficult week for the city of new york four days after hurricane sandy made landfall life has not yet returned to normal. gas short
PBS
Nov 8, 2012 12:00pm PST
what can be done for us, it's about what can be done by us to the hard and frustrating but necessary work of self-government. that's the principle we were founded on. >> rose: many saw this election as a choice between starkly different visions of america, particularly the role of government and how to fix the economy. throughout the campaign, president obama emphasized the need for balancing individualism with collective values. in doing so, he echoed the language of the new deal as franklin delano roosevelt once said "in our personal ambitions we're individualalists but in seeking political progress as a nation we all go up or else all go down as one people." its remains to be seen whether the country can heal the wounds in the shadow of the fiscal cliff. we watch as president obama seeks to make good on his promises in a second term. joining me from chicago is bill daley. he served as white house chief of staff from january 2011 to january 2012. in february he was appointed as a co-chair of the president's reelection campaign. so my question first is about the politics of this ele
PBS
Nov 27, 2012 6:00pm PST
nieto, this afternoon. one topic for them and for us tonight: the war on drugs, on both sides of the border. >> suarez: as lawmakers talk of reducing the country's debt, paul solman offers a history lesson on centuries of federal borrowing. >> the united states was going into default. we defaulted on many obligations to foreign creditors and to our own soldiers. >> brown: plus, every month, 1,000 young americans are infected with h.i.v., and most of those with the disease don't even know they have it. hari sreenivasan looks at a new report from the c.d.c. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you
PBS
Oct 31, 2012 6:00pm PDT
, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some places. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honking ) the power did not. police helped direct traffic with signals still dark, but one taxi driver said it wasn't worth the risk. >> it's been dangerous. i've got to go home, i'll walk. there's no traffic signal light, no nothing there. >> woodruff: you're going home? you're done? >> i'm done already. >> woodruff: it wasn't much easier for pedestrians who made their way on foot, some with only flashlights leading the way. >> it's really unsettling because we don't have power. we don't know what's going on. w
PBS
Nov 17, 2012 12:00am PST
now impossible to keep track of how every company and how people are using the internet. there's so much dynamism. that's what makes me optimistic that it's still at the very beginning. >> rose: and british actress keira knightley inhabits her latest tragic her win on anna karenina. >> doingpride & prejudice was frightening because that is the character people love some of and women want to be that anna is not that kind of a creature. she's a sort of very difficult jewel like creature but she's not somebody that people want to be. so from that kind of perspective it wasn't as terrifying as making on something like elizabeth bennett. but it was definitely challenging. she is a very odd one. >> rose: bezos and knightley when we continue. funding for charlry rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. dns-- jeff bezos is here, the c.e.o. of amazon.com. he founded the company in 1994 out of his garage as an on-line bookseller. today it is a 100 billion dollar empire and the world's largest e-com
PBS
Nov 6, 2012 4:00pm PST
was taking any chances, mounted a last-minute effort to get us support at the polls. -- to get the best support at the polls. >> this is america, a democracy. this is what it is all about. >> will he stay in power for another four years or be rejected after one term? the president is checking to make sure there is no backsliding from supporters. >> we feel confident that we will win, but it will determine on voter turnout. -- be determined by voter turnout. i would encourage everyone to participate in this process that people have fought so hard for us to have. >> more than 90 million americans are expected to vote today. all eyes are on the ohio, one of just eight states that could go either way and will decide the election. >> i am not thrilled with either choice, but i will stick with barack. >> we are really sick with what has been going on with the fans in the last four years. >> after america elected its first black president cannot many were filled with hope. >> -- its first black president, many were filled with hope. >> they are trying to rebuild the giant coalition using
PBS
Nov 2, 2012 8:00pm PDT
things that stand between us in some of the best years we've known is lack of leadership. and that's why we have elections after off. this tuesday is the moment to look into the future and imagine what we can do, to put the past four years behind us and start building a new future. >> and barack obama looking presidential yesterday in a bomber jacket in air force one saying romney is not worth the risk. >> after four years as president, you know me by now. you may not agree with every decision i've made. you may be frustrated at the pace of change, but you know what i believe. you know where i stand. you know i'm willing to make tough decisions even when they're not politically convenient. >> let's start by assessing these closing arguments. john, "you know me by know" can work both ways? >> it can work both ways but for this president that's not a bad closing argument. he also got a decent bit of economic news with the jobs report, came in about 46,000 over what the consensus forecast had been. and so he's casting this as we're slowly going in the right direction. we're on the right
PBS
Nov 6, 2012 2:30pm PST
us. a conversation with oliver stone and peter kuznick coming up. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: we are just hours away from polls opening on the east coast. it could be a long night. only time will tell how this raised will turn out in history, but history is. we want to bring you a unique project from oliver stone. the two have teamed up for an unprecedented showtime series called the untold history of the united states. the show kicks off on showtime and also features his companion botook. first of preview of the untold history of the united states. >> roosevelt made his solos move yet. the stakes have rarely been higher in a presidential election, and roosevelt shows his
PBS
Nov 7, 2012 7:00pm PST
for business leaders. the c.e.o. of caesars entertainment, tells us it'll be "very damaging" for his company. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! wall street greeted the election results with a big sell-off in stocks. investors dumped shares of almost every type, giving the s&p 500 it's worst day since june. beyond the u.s. elections, europe also brought fresh worries for investors with concerns in greece, and germany. here's how the numbers stacked up on wall street. the dow lost 312 points, at it's worst point of the day, the blue chip index was down 369 points. the nasdaq tumbled nearly 75 points and the s&p 500 off 33. suzanne pratt takes a look at where the market goes from here. >> reporter: let's be candid. this is not the election outcome that wall street wanted to see. after all many investors believe president obama's tax policies will hurt corporate profits. on top of that there's the likelihood of more regulation in the president's second term. those concerns were evident in selling today of energy, banking and healthcare stocks. a quick look at the price board at
PBS
Nov 1, 2012 7:00pm PDT
far as are we going to have a recession in early 2013? >> reporter: which brings us back to the huge roll that federal policy now plays in the economy. after the election, lawmakers have a chance to boost the economy by reaching an agreement to extend expiring tax cuts and ease looming spending cuts; or they can jump off the so-called fiscal cliff and see if the economy follows. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> tom: retail sales moved higher in october as retailers closed their books on the month before sandy rushed ashore. macy's surprised with a better than expected 4% sales gains; kohl's and target also fared well. warehouse store costco was up 5%, while nordstrom was the standout. the high-end retailer posting a near 10% sales gain. >> susie: and auto sales moved higher in october, despite hurricane sandy crimping sales in the final days of the month. sales at g.m. rose almost 5% on strength in its cadillac and buick brands. at ford, sales barely budged, up just four tenths of a percent. the auto maker believes the massive storm cost the industry as many as 25,000 sales in the l
PBS
Nov 29, 2012 4:00pm PST
national public radio joins us from new york. david, you cover the ins and outs of the phone hacking scandal from this side of the pond. what do you make of the call for an independent regulator of the press? >> we have to take into account the egregiousness of the offenses. if it were the iraqi war dead, out there will be people with bayonets and pitchforks. this goes against everything that we hold dear about a free press. to be able to have government decide and regulate what the press does short of libelous. here in the states, a self regulation is seen as something of a joke. it occurs only in small outposts in washington state and minnesota the idea that a government body will work as independent, that does not sit well with american people. rubbishabout people's being sorted through for information about them? >> you have to imagine that even in the short term in the tabloids in the u.k., and even some of our supermarkets in the u.s., people are going to shy away from doing things that might attract attention. but people are going to do what they are going to do to get the new
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Nov 12, 2012 2:30pm PST
presidential election behind us, perhaps we can get past the petty bickering and focus on the issues on our lives. the so-called war on drugs, eugene jarecki turns his lens on the drug issue. his new documentary is called "the house i live in" and was awarded at the sundance festival. conversation with eugene jarecki coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: eugene jarecki is an award winning filmmaker whose previous projects include "why we fight." is the latest project is "the house we live in." here are some scenes. >> you have to understand the war on drugs has never been about drugs. >> americas public enemy number one is a drug abuse. >> what wi
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Nov 29, 2012 1:00am PST
today joins us. he is david cote, c.e.o. of honeywell. david, thank you so much for joining us. we really appreciate it. did you get the sen from house speaker boehner, he is ready to make a deal? >> i would say there is a recognition on all sides about the significance and importance of a deal. it is a real question about getting both sides en the room to actually hammer it out and get something done because we don't have a lot of time left. >> susie: president obama said he would like to have a deal by christmas. from what you heard today, how realistic is that? >> if they want to, they can get this done in a couple of days. it is just a matter of kind of working out some of these important details. but it's a matter, i think, they just need to get together and get started. i think both recognize the need for a market-credible $4 trillion deal, and it has got to comprise both tax increases that are believable and that will happen, and entitlement reform that is believable and will happen. both of those things will have to be an important part of this. >> susie: did speaker boehne
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Nov 3, 2012 1:00am PDT
customers the ability not to have the stress of those fees on them and us be there to serve them. >> tom: the view of one of the biggest banks impacted by sandy. frank bisignano is the cochief operating officer at jp rgan chase. j.p. morgan chase is among hundreds of companies lending a helping hand to the victims of superstorm sandy. corporate america has pledged over $50 million. the big bank is offering $5 million in loans to affected small businesses and donating to the american red cross. other household names giving include coca-cola, delta airlines, disney, home depot, lowe's, the nfl and target. from fuel to cash to communications. verizon communications warned today hurricane sandy could wreak havoc on its fourth quarter earnings. the wireless, phone and internet provider took on major damage in the storm. four of its facilities in new york flooded. as sylvia hall reports, verizon's warning is a sign of the damage felt by the tele- communications industry. >> reporter: just like with other telecom companies, verizon employees are working hard to restore service to the no
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Nov 29, 2012 6:00pm PST
newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the battle for control of syria reached ever closer to the capital today. heavy fighting flared near the damascus airport, and online access was cut, as the pressure intensified on president bashar al-assad. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: it could be the west's worst nightmare. jubilant jihadist fighters near damascus. this group has captured a helicopter and these islamists are now in the vanguard of syria's rebel army. syrian warplanes and helicopters were filmed attacking the fringes of the capital today. and to the road to the international airport
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Nov 28, 2012 6:00pm PST
. >> warner: and on the "daily download," we look at how the obama administration is re-using digital information gathered for the campaign to rally support now. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington was a-whirl today with more talk of avoiding the much-discussed fiscal cliff. but as november wound down, the president suggested an agreement on taxes and spending could come in time for the holidays. >> i believe that both parties can agree on a frame work that does that in the coming weeks. in fact my hope is to get this done before christmas. >> you know me, i was born with the glass half full. i'm an optimist. >> brown: hopeful signs emanated from the white house and the capitol today, about getting a deal before the new year brings automatic tax hikes and spending cuts. p
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Nov 20, 2012 2:30pm PST
have joined us. coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome the maria to this program. in addition to your column and the syndicated series, she is the host of a show on cnbc and joins us tonight from new york city. the dow have you back on the program. >> good to be with you. >> i mentioned all this drama, what happened at the closing bell the day? >> we saw a pretty good rally, there was rhetoric over the weekend that the two sides, republicans and democrats along with the president have the will to come together on these very important issues surrounding the fiscal cliff. has been a rocky situation as investors anticipate any outgoing talks fr
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Nov 9, 2012 2:30pm PST
joins us from new york. good to have you back on this program. >> it is great to be with you, tavis. tavis: there so as to talk about. your thoughts on what happened this week, giuliani presidential race and whether you were surprised by any of the results. >> i definitely thought that president obama would win. when you look at what mitt romney said along the way, when you looked at his actions, when you look at the 47%, i wondered if he would win, if his number would be 47%, talking about the people who would not vote for him. but president obama, now in his second term, i think presents us an extremely interesting challenge to many of the people who voted for him. i mean, you now have the community organizer in chief as the commander-in-chief. that started in 2008. the question is who does the community organizing now. i think president obama himself laid out the challenge to people. it happened when he was running for office in 2008. he was in the backyard of someone's house in new jersey at a meet and greet and somebody raised their hand and said what will you do about the midd
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Nov 14, 2012 4:00pm PST
strikes have been used to send messages about the toughness of israeli leaders. >> we will take whatever action is necessary to put a stop to this. this is not merely our right. it is also our duty. >> hamas has sworn to hit back. they said the same thing during the last gossan warner -- gazan war. this showed limitations against israel's army. before the assassination, the egyptian government had been working to establish a cease- fire, and efforts have been praised by top security officials. egypt's president is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. the assassination will be seen as a calculated and dangerous insult. egypt strongly condemns what israel is doing in gaza. this is an unacceptable act, and we deeply condemn it. >> what has changed since the war? the west and israel have lost their most reliable friend, and egypt's president mubarak. they saw him as an indispensable part of the solution at times like this. >> heightened tensions in the middle east tonight. in other news from around the world, the united nations secretary general ban ki moon has set a report on the fa
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Nov 15, 2012 7:00pm PST
, washington. >> susie: joining us now, mitchell crusto. he's a law professor at loyola university in new orleans, and has been studying the b.p. case and the relationship between business and the environment. how important is today's set element -- settlement. >> this is the biggest story.no. we have more dollars at stake. >> in terms of how importantthil us a little more. it's a record settlement. but it does encompass quite a few different features. in addition to the felony charges there is the fec investigation and the resolution of that matter and that is a big deal. >> darren is saying it's notove. the government is bringing gross negligence charges against bp. bp is going to fight it vigorously how is that going to play out? >> it's difficult for them toave standard when they admitted to the felony charges. when it's related to the environment. it's some $20 billion this is a big story but it's an even bigger story ahead. >> there have been so many fines there a silver lining to all of this? does this make the deep water drilling safer going into the future? >> well it's certainly
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Nov 23, 2012 12:00am PST
miss him, if i could talk to any of them it would be dumbledore. >> this gives us neither knowledge nor truth, men have wasted away in front of it. even gone mad. that is why tomorrow it will be moved to a new home. and i must ask you, not to go looking for it again. it the does not do to dwell on dreams, harry. and forget to live. >> rose: so you set out to write this new book. you knew it was going to be about adults. >> uh-huh uh. >> rose: what else did you know after you had that inspiration on that plane? >> well, the germ of the idea was a council of action, a local council election that would be subverted by teenagers. which was a device to expose certain secrets, yes, that was the basic idea and i was excited by that idea because, it was going to give me an opportunity to explore a lot of things that are important to me, and things that obsessed me frankly. >> rose: and. >> well, for example, i just talked about the fact that i was in a very prekaren situation for a few, precarious situation and probably as poor as you could be without being homeless in uk, friends and famil
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Nov 14, 2012 1:00am PST
protect the principals the voters endorsed at the ballot box. >> darren gersh is with us tonight from our washington, d.c. bureau, where a week after election day here. was there any progress made by the staffs of the political players during the campaign season? where do we stand? >> the staff is always looking at this as a giant chess game and trying to figure out how they can give their bosses their best move, so the staff have been working. we had a lot of commissions and a lot of efforts to try to solve the budget problems. there is a lot of work done behind the scenes and on paper. a deal could come together pretty quickly. the problem is the principals, the leaders, the people who were elected, they have to come back and decide what they're going to do. they're talking about getting an agreement, but nobody knows how to get that agreement right now. >> tom: it pays to parse language when we're at this point in negotiations for politicians. we're hearing about tax rates and tax revenue. they say no increase on tax rates, but they're willing to accept higher tax revenues. what's the
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Nov 4, 2012 4:00pm PST
an $11 million political contribution to a group opposing proposition 30. tell us what the judge decided. >> well, a judge decided that mysterious arizona group needed to disclose its donors or disclose them to the state. the group appealed. the disclose sure is still tied up, as we speak. the disclosure hasn't happened. and the state and the attorney general and the fair political practice commission has asked the state supreme court to make the group give them the document so they can examine it to see if they have to disclose the doe mores. all of this is happening right before the election and whether to be seen. it's $11 million, a lot of money, until you kind of back up and look at the larger macro-focus here. the map light foundation, which tracks campaign money, both in california and other parts of the country, came out with a number recently that they calculate $350 million on ballot measures alone this general election season in california, remember that doesn't include legislative congressional, anything else. 350 many ballot measures. prop 30, prop 32, this union pay
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Nov 2, 2012 12:00am PDT
reporting this story. >> the most important thing i've learned is really how vulnerable so much us are. you don't have to report the story, you just need to look at the tv and sandy over the last few days. what's so amazing about the storm was the sheer size. it struck 50, 60 million americans and did so almost simultaneously and that really truly taxed the ability of any society to respond to that. you couldn't borrow personnel, new york couldn't take personnel from new jersey or connecticut because everyone was going to be hit at once. we're all in this together and you have to accept that fact. >> rose: there's this question also which is the argument that's been made over the last years with increasing velocity. it is that cyber attacks could produce some of the same results we're experiencing today by being able to damage the electric grid in an even more severe way. >> yes, absolutely. that's a scary thought. we've seen just what life is like with a few million people without power. you can see the grid go down in a large way, if it was not easy to put it back together again.
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Nov 6, 2012 12:00am PST
minus north carolina and indiana. that's an early night for us all. althoughs pennsylvania better than i do. i don't think it's been awe thenltally in play. i think there was a series of head fakes going on but that's never been a central battleground. >> rose: mark? >> well, they're winning pennsylvania because this is the first campaign where no one has to make choices about money because they have enough to spend and they had extra money and there wasn't any other place to put and the public polls make it clear it's closer. the president will win by a more narrow margin than four years ago. i think that the -- i agree with matthew the fundamentals matter most of all. ohio is a tricky place, though, because while the economy is better than it was, still not particularly good. >> rose: is ohio enough for governor romney? >> if he wins the southern states and colorado it's enough. >> and i think one of the conversations maybe we'll have in the aftermath of this is one of the things he's had in ohio-- and it's the electoral problem that he has had-- is that the electoral college mo
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Nov 27, 2012 12:00am PST
they're playing notre dame. >> well, i don't want us to play notre dame this year. >> rose: what makes you think he doesn't go to the office on saturday and sunday? >> i go to the office on saturday. >> rose: but what you do at the office and at home is the same thing. reading and on the phone. >> i'm reading and thinking and on the phone and talking to friends. there's very little difference in saturday and sunday from the weekdays. a little more action during the week, though. (laughs) >> rose: this reminds me of what surprised you most about him in terms of advice. you asked him what was the worst advice? >> well, we were doing a big action. he was going to be on the cover and so i -- without truly knowing the answer to the question i said all right, now, tell me what is the best advice you've ever gotten in your life from anyone? and he proceeded to talk for a long time about the worst advice that he had ever gotten. so i went back and told my managing editor this, which probably kind of -- with my head down in thinking well i hadn't come back with quite the right thing and we put
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Nov 11, 2012 3:00pm PST
. >> nina, break it down for us. >> i do not think he has a mandate. i think the republicans and democrats both have a mandate for compromise. when you heard from republicans -- it is like mitch mcconnell who said his job was to see that obama is never reelected. so, he has an edge year. he does have leverage. but it will be a long haul. he does need partners. >> rich mcconnell is on record as saying that -- mitch mcconnell is on the record as saying that he knows that the election makes some people think that the republicans are going to roll over. that does not sound like compromise. >> your definition of compromise is rolling over and excepting higher tax rates. that is the democratic definition of compromise. i would never suggest bias. the president ran -- i will say it -- the most negative campaign. he did not run on his record. he could not. he did not run on a program. there is one thing he got a mandate for, and he now has a mandate to raise the top tax rate on two percent of the population by four. ? that is the smallest mandate in american history. >> can i say somethi
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Nov 18, 2012 3:00pm PST
. -- republicans want zero. >> business community does not want us to go over the cliff. >> what the republicans amenable to increases in taxes -- >> use the word "revenue." >> you had nancy pelosi taking the position -- $1 million, not $250,000. john mccain has suggested make it $500,000. that is where the movement is going to come, with that number. >> is there a deal in the works behind closed doors that we don't know about? >> i don't think so. public posturing at this point. >> here is the difference since the election. the tea party is not as strong as it was. yes, the members who came back one at gerrymandered districts, but speaker boehner has more control of his caucus this time. >> mitt romney explains why president obama won the election. >> what the president is give them two things -- one, big gift on immigration with the dream act and the amnesty program. no. 2, he put in place obamacare, which basically is $10,000 a family. >> mitt romney explaining to his biggest donors why he lost the election. gov. bobby jindal, chris christie, they don't like that kind of talk. >>
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Nov 8, 2012 2:30pm PST
new show, "larry king now." join us for conversation about election night. coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we continue to digest the results of last night, i could not think of a better person to break down the results that a man who has covered so many of these. how many? since what year? >> on the broadcast of 1960. >> i was born in 1964. >> stop it. i was on the radio and television in 1960. it was the first televised debate. tavis: i remember this. >> nixon had just come from the hospital. i heard it from the radio. i thought it was a tie. when i got to the studio i heard that cannady murdered him. tavis: the talk-show host is doing a new project,
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Nov 21, 2012 1:00am PST
in our arsenal that comes close." >> susie: bernanke is already using the weapons in his arsenal to fix the job market, which he said today is still "unhealthy". he also repeated the fed's plan to keep interest rates super low at least into 2015. >> we will want to be sure that the recovery is established before we begin to normalize policy. we hope that such assurances will reduce uncertainty and increase confidence among households and businesses. >> susie: but bernanke gave no hints on when americans can expect to see higher rates. >> the further we go down the road, the question is going to turn to how is the fed going to reverse policy, and what the chairman said today is that decision is a long way off. >> susie: on wall street, stocks slipped on that fiscal cliff warning from bernanke and then recovered. the dow lost seven points, but the nasdaq and the s&p both gained about a point. rebecca patterson joins us now to talk more about the markets and bernanke. she's the chief investment officer of bessemer trust. >> hi, rebecca, nice to have you with us. >> hi. thank you. >> su
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Nov 1, 2012 2:30pm PDT
glad you have joined us. coming up, right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: sara lawrence-lightfoot is a renowned harvard professor and author. her latest book is called "exit: the endings that set us free." good to have the on this program. >> it is great to be here. thank you, tavis. tavis: tell me more about your fascination with endings. >> i have noticed for a very long time, from when i was very young, how we did about x's, departures, bias, in our schools, our neighborhoods, that we are so preoccupied with beginnings, with launchings, was tilting toward the future and seizing opportunities that we neglect the important moments of reflection that can go on when we are
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Nov 22, 2012 4:00pm PST
dutch prime minister warned against using a veto. keep a loaded gun in your pocket, he said. there is a fundamental divide on the one side that pay more than they get out. in germany and the spending 11 billion. the u.k. is next with 7 billion. others get more than they put in. greece receives over 4 billion. those countries which received big grants have been joined forces to remove any cuts. they reduce that by 80 billion and don't hold a slight cut. >> this proposal is a step in the right direction but doesn't go far and tough enough, they say. the problem is, the closer officials get to the british position, the more it alienates us. >> farmers are protesting, fearing that it will reduce subsidies. sometime this evening, a new budget proposal will emerge and be passed to the leaders. >> of that document can determine if an agreement can be reached or if it will be deadlocked. >> for more on the summit in brussels, i spoke a short while ago with chris morris. >> after 14 hours of preliminary talks, called 27 leaders are sitting around a table together , everyone has got plenty of l
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Nov 27, 2012 7:00pm PST
booming business. >> reporter: it used to be consumers would buy private label products to clean their bathrooms or wash their clothes. lately, however, they're eating them, too. from sodas to peanut butter, private label brands are shaking off the yuck! stigma and attracting value-conscious customers. and it's the popularity of private label food that's behind the tasty conagra-ralcorp deal. >> private label, otherwise known as store brands, is gaining traction with retailers and shoppers. in fact, store brands have been growing faster than branded food for some time, and we expect that to continue. >> reporter: it might be hard to believe, but store brands now account for about a fifth of all packaged foods sold in the u.s., and at 70 $billion, we're talking big business. conagra is known for name brands like pam, slim jim, and reddi whip, and it also makes some private label goods. ralcorp is the top manufacturer of growing store brand categories such as cereal and pasta, and it supplies companies like walmart and mcdonald's. together, conagra and ralcorp could become a private labe
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Nov 5, 2012 6:00pm PST
know who our president is and what he's willing to do for us, we are even more excited about getting him re-elected. >> this morning we hit 600 houses. this afternoon we probably hit about 20 or 0 houses. not everybody was home but enough people were home that we were able to spread the word. >> woodruff: we assess the polls and the state of the race on election eve with stuart rothenberg, susan page, and andrew kohut. >> ifill: lawyers gear up to monitor polling stations tomorrow. what will they find? jeffrey brown takes a look. >> woodruff: and from legalizing marijuana to gay marriage and taxes, we break down ballot measures worth watching. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: all its own. with united health care, i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united health care. >> compu
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Nov 29, 2012 7:00pm PST
should not change implausible after the election. and the white house warned republicans against using the debt limit as leverage to force agreement. >> asking for... that a political price be paid in order for congress to do its job, to ensure that the united states of america pays its bills and does not default for the first time in its history, is deeply irresponsible. >> reporter: at least talks are going on. the speaker and the president spoke by phone for almost half an hour last night. but a first negotiating round between treasury secretary timothy geithner and congressional leaders did nothing to improve the tone on capitol hill. democrats said the ball was in the speaker's court. >> we're saying, extend the tax cuts for the middle class as part of that. we know if we do nothing, the top rates go up. we're waiting for the republicans to come forward with something. that's our proposal, period. >> reporter: no one in washington ever thought negotiations to get past the fiscal cliff would be easy. now, more and more are talking about a rerun of what happened with the tarp bailou
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Nov 24, 2012 1:00am PST
even earlier, a lot ofstores, including wal-mart, target and toys r us opened their stores on thanksgiving as opposed to waiting for black friday. they did receive a little bit of grief for it from a lot of angry consumers, but on the other hand, there were lots of shoppers lining up in front of the stores to get those deals from wal-mart and toys r us. >> are the deals likely to get better if they are not satisfied with the crowd and the sales receipts we see over the next 72 hours? >> well, in fact, deals could continue to go on at all way until christmas over the next couple of weekends. we saw that wal-mart doubled their order of the apple tablets in order to guarantee that they would have enough to meet the demand and as a result analysts did become bullish on the company and did increase their earnings estimates for the fourth quarter for wal-mart so we are seeing retailers are becoming more competitive in order to at track attract the shop intoorz the stores. >> you mentioned apple and i want to ask you about that strategy in a moment but it also speaks to inventory con
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Nov 13, 2012 4:00pm PST
a week. a marathon man on a mission that boo leave most of us in the dust. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. bizarre. it is the only way to describe the scandal that has already claimed the job of the c.i.a. director and now has america's top commander in afghanistan under investigation. both are strange enough, but how do you explain the addition of a shirtless f.b.i. agent and 30,000 e-mails. here is the latest. >> it is a washington drama with a stellar cast. the spy chief, the top general and two women who soon found themselves at the heart of american power. the lid came off the scandal last friday with an admission of adult tri by general david petraeus, the revered military commander who had become the head of the c.i.a. he had cheated on his wife of 38 years with paula broadwell, a married former military intelligence officer who became close to the general while writing his biography, which she then publicized. >> i think he is a terrific role model for young people. >> how does this scandal unfold? it began when another woman, jill
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Nov 23, 2012 3:00pm PST
years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: demonstrations, clashes with the police, and tear gas in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in
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Nov 18, 2012 5:00pm PST
this planet. it's at war with us." >> and-- >> there's something fundamentally flawed about a system where in order to get elected the members of congress have to rely on the very people who are lobbying them day in and day out. because that's their principal source of funding, those lobbyists and the interests they represent. >> funding is provided by: carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org." anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. t
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Nov 13, 2012 2:30pm PST
everyone is talking about this week, david petraeus. we are glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: tomorrow night on this program, we'll bring you our conversation with frank rich. he takes a critical look of what went wrong for the gop and the prospects of moving forward. that should be a good conversation tomorrow night. tonight, we wanted to start this week with the story that is shaking up washington. the sudden resignation of cia director david petraeus. thomas ricks is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist and a best-selling author. he is a fellow at the center for a new american security. good to have you back on this program. let's get the petraeus stuff a
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Nov 21, 2012 2:30pm PST
canada. if we are glad you have joined us. coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: paul tough is a contributor for the new york times magazine, published a book on education this year, how children succeed, the hidden power of character. good have you back and congratulations on your success. can i pick apart the title? how children succeed, i get it. the hidden power of character, it seems to me that the way the kids learn is to be encouraged to try and to fail. try again, fail again, fail better. it is a wonderful quote from beckett but parents don't want their kids to fail. they are trying to get into competitive schools, but how do learned when nobody encour
PBS
Nov 2, 2012 4:00pm PDT
watching the reaction for us. >> the voter in the state of ohio -- >> in 2008 we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. today our businesses have created nearly 5 1/2 million new jobs and this morning we learned the companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. >> new jobs were created in america in october. 171,000 of them, many in health care, retail and business services. many more people returned to the workforce, possibly a sign of economic optimism. but still these are not numbers to excite a tired and skittish electorate. mitt romney, campaigning in wisconsin, trying to erode mr. obama's support in the midwest. he took the job's numbers as support for the central plank of his campaign, but the u.s. economy has failed to recover. >> he said he was going to focus on creating jobs. instead he focused on obamacare, which killed jobs. he said he was going to cut the federal deficit in half, and then he doubled it. he said he was going to lower the unemployment rate down to 5.2% right now. today we
PBS
Nov 6, 2012 3:00pm PST
you to this special edition of the newshour. kwame holman starts us off tonight with an election day wrap-up. then, we take the temperature at the campaigns' headquarters, with ray suarez in chicago and margaret warner in boston. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks join us with their analysis. >> ifill: jeffrey brown on who's voting and why, plus key congressional races with christina bellantoni and stuart rothenberg. >> woodruff: we get historical perspective from michael beschloss and richard norton smith. >> ifill: and hari sreenvasan shows how you can find the latest results online at our data-driven map center. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> music is a universal language. when i was in an accident i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own. with united health care i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from, and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people lo
PBS
Nov 9, 2012 12:00am PST
out there waiting for us. >> rose: a politician thinks of the next election, a statesman of the next gentlemen of the jury race said the theologian james clerk and you can't govern in poetry or pros. we want to raise this question. where is america 2012, 236 years after its birth and where is it going, the challenge of the next administration to both immediate and deep. no great country sustained its position without a strong economic foundation. the new president and new congress must deal with a fiscal cliff. partisan grid lock has present us from making hard decisions about where we need to stand and where we need to cut and how we bridge a growing economic inequity. while we remain the richest country of the world the economic order is rebalancing. economic powers are changing as we've seen to the response of the arab spring. defining east, demands between china and the united states and the realization it is not a zero sum game. there are problems that transcend are lationships, climate change global health and science. science and technology are giving us extraordinary ins
PBS
Nov 21, 2012 12:00am PST
entry and egress, even via egypt israel still is trying to maintain the regime it used to have whereby it monitored everybody going in and out, egyptian intelligence has not ceased to coordinate on people to this day the population of gaza cannot come and go freely, that is the key, that is the key element of this siege, it is not just cement or napkins or diapers, that was the issue before, that is not the issue now. it is free movement. >> well, there is never going to be 100 percent free movement because there is a border there. but it can be a more open border. >> rose: dennis. >> i was going to say, i do think, one of the promises that no doubt that the egyptians have made to hamas is they are going to open up the border, their border with gaza, and i do think that makes a difference. >> it will. >> the fact is, if the key here is going to be, a, to the egyptians, do the egyptians do something about the arms going into gaza, b, do they ease their border with gaza, and in a sense there is probably a relationship between those two points, where the israelis it is a lot easie
PBS
Nov 7, 2012 12:00am PST
home! >> that future is out there! it is waiting for us! >> tonight, a special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: a politician thinks of the next election, a statesman of the next generation so says james free man clarke. while all the world focuses on the election results, e we want to raise this question: where is america 2012, 236 years after its birth, and where is it going? the challenge for the next administration are both immediate and deep. no great country has sustained its position without a strong economic foundation. the new president and new congress must deal with the fiscal cliff, partisan gridlock has prevented us from making the hard decisions about where we need to spend and where we need to cut and how we bridge a growing economic inequality. while we remain the richest country in the world, the global economic order is rebalancing. the application of american power is changing as we have seen in the response to the arab spring. old alliances need redefining. the pivot to the east demands understanding between china and the united states and the realization that
PBS
Nov 21, 2012 4:00am PST
affected. >> to us, it's just how we live. you don't get to make choices in how you live. >> one in 13 americans is now unemployed, and many children are growing up with little hope for their future. >> i'm surprised by how things can change so fast. you can go from doing okay to going hungry and on the verge of being homeless again. >> and we're going to start with numbers one through 20. >> food banks struggle to keep up with demand, and homeless shelters have long waiting lists, as even middle-income families sometimes lose their homes with just a few days' notice. >> if the tv can fit in your school bag, you can take it. if it didn't fit, you couldn't take it. >> we asked these children wht a life being poor in america really looks like, through their eyes. >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontliis provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available
PBS
Nov 1, 2012 4:00pm PDT
election just five days away, cautiously, politicians are moving on. >> he used to make the space where he would scrunch up his face -- >> but others never will. she lost her son to the storm. jacob was 23. he and a friend were crushed by falling tree. >> he kept calling me every 20 minutes, and finally, -- i kept calling him every 20 minutes, and finally, a man answered his phone, and i asked who he was. he said he was detective simon, and i asked where my son was, and he asked my address, said he wanted to come to my apartment. >> the lights are out. the power gone. in manhattan alone, 750,000 people are without electricity. every day that passes, businesses are losing money. >> i have never seen anything like it. look at this. what a mess. >> do you have power? >> do i have power? no, i am in the dark. >> there is one ray of light, and it is underground. the new york subway began offering restricted service this morning, allowing some commuters to take their usual journey, but it will be many months before the familiar everyday parts of the city returned. >> for more on the sit
PBS
Nov 22, 2012 3:00pm PST
, just soaking up the moment. and i'm kind of like, "wow, i could definitely get used to this." >> when i first stepped on that stage it was like heaven, like i had won more than a billion dollars. >> when they step on stage for the very first time, that... you know, it's kind of a culmination of the entire five days. and then we run through their medley numbers. >> during the technical rehearsal in the afternoon, while one medley's out on stage working, the lighting designer and the music director are doing their thing, and backstage, our job is to just be ready for what comes next. and then my task is to keep them focused and quiet. >> ♪ bad news, go 'way call round some day... ♪ >> so sometimes that means they lip-synch along to their friends' medleys and do a kind of silent backstage dance party. >> ♪ may fall down stairs who cares, who cares i'm dancing and i... ♪ >> the biggest challenge is the clock. it's a ticking clock. and no matter what happens, we've got a show. and there are right now 1,500 people coming. >> we only have a few hours to tech the entire show. we go as
PBS
Nov 13, 2012 10:00pm PST
concluded that if you turned it 90 degrees, that would be the way to do it. one of us suggested maybe he'd like to have a last smoke. so i got him his tobacco and his pipe, and he enjoyed that. and then he indicated that it was time. he took the gun-- he had loaded it-- and with the aid of his walker, we walked out to the garden. he chose the spot, and he decided he would lie down. so we said goodbye. and i shook his hand. i walked up the road a few hundred feet. i started to say, "god bless you," and i got "god bless" out when i heard the shot. he had put the revolver in his mouth, and it was instantly effective. and his pulse ceased soon after that. and i felt very sure that i could report that he was dead. >> narrator: john welles, a long-time friend of hunt williams, had been diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer a few months earlier. 66 years old and fiercely independent, john had always told friends that he would take his own life if he ever became incapacitated. >> to a man like john, this bear of a man who was reduced to an invalid, life didn't offer him anything after that. ther
PBS
Nov 18, 2012 4:00pm PST
and trade. and lauren sommer, tell us what that's about. it's a mystery to a lot of people. >> it sounds kind of wonky. but what it is, it's the most aggressive climate change policy in the country. this goes back to six years ago when governor arnold schwarzenegger passed the landmark global warming law in the state. it has a huge goal which is to cut the greenhouse gas emissions 30% by 2020. >> why don't we give schwarzenegger the credit for that? he didn't pass it. the legislature. >> we'll give him that credit. but it's a huge feat. there's a number of programs, but it started with cap and trade. it applies to oil refineries, manufacturers, food processors. >> polluters. so you brought some props with you. >> i brought some props. >> we're going to show how cap and trade works. so let's bring out the props. and try to figure out, how do you cut pollution in a state where there's a lot of industry, and a lot of oil refineries, and cement companies. what have you got here? >> first of all, let's start with the cap part of cap and trade. this is an overall limit on the greenhouse
PBS
Nov 16, 2012 2:30pm PST
joined us. a conversation with sally field coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: what a pleasure to welcome sally field to this program. the oscar winner has been a beloved actress. currently starring in what is the most talked about films of "lincoln" lincoln quote. a trip down memory lane. can we do that? >> i guess so. tavis: a small sampling of your award winning career. >> you know, i was on broadway wants. >> really? >> for almost 12 minutes. the show closed the first night. i was so good. you should have seen me. he's going to take you and the fire department to get me out of here. i'll wait for the sheriff. until heoing to budge gets here. >> stop thinking about
PBS
Nov 7, 2012 2:30pm PST
? >> sure, and i am proud that showtime put this on. this does not use again on american television. but they are very proud of it and it gets repeated and repeated. we have foreign showings of it. hopefully, one day, it will be a text in a school. it deserves to be. it is better than my daughters text, which is apparently the ninth edition. >> and the book is getting widely distributed. it is being sold in costco, wal- mart, sam's. tavis: texas is one example of a state where they are trying to find -- i am trying to get the right word -- they are tidiegetg tighter and tighter in clamping down about what goes into textbooks. before we know it, sliver will have been a carnival. they're changing what happened -- slavery will have been a carnival. they're changing so much what happened. what makes you think we can never get to this kind of truth in a textbook? >> we have made some progress. in the 1980's and 1990's, they did introduce elements of multiculturalism, the kind of triumph ant history is not there anymore. oliver's dollars textbook is so bad on the atomic bomb that it is un
PBS
Nov 20, 2012 4:00pm PST
target you úk9yqz"tqi t(sr&ies. úk9yqz"tqi t(sr&ies. q.%i>> civiliansw#7mx using ruth's israel said would not be attacked. Ñ,the villages and refugee cams they left behind were shelled. ; s>3w for more onóu8j the interl efforts in this crisis iw spa brief time ago with the former state department official cambridge, massachusetts. w hillary clinton is inç israel, Â÷ engagement in a week.l do? >>;1íh it is clear from her pres conference that the u.s. is hamas fired. vÑnjrockets into israel for weeks. a reallyore9l important stock ia trip will be in cairo when she meets the egyptian president. on the one hand,1o egyptian government is much hamas and s more clearly with it. pt needsto deserve its relationh thecm  u.s., with europe,b;zw-e i and others. think youwmw2ñ wiy clinton make it clearg2s to the egyptian leadership that they have got toúunm use their influe sq%ei+ ÷ firing rockets. fjc&nñçuwfthey fired aq/ 8j=/m today which is nonsensical given how many pounds of thousands of major objective forthe[v$ secr. >> theárqíwo# israelinn! office expressing that th
PBS
Nov 30, 2012 12:00pm PST
is welcome to us except perhaps if you have a fundamentalist extremist group coming on top and governing the country. which i don't think is acceptable to anybody else. >> no one wants that, or someone but maybe iran. >> i done think so. i done think iran wants a fundamentalist sunni-- . >> rose: not sunni. >> state. >> rose: so explain to us because are you there and on the ground talking to people, what is it they fear and are those fears legitimate that people do not know who would come to power if assad leaves power? we'll go back again to the surprising aspect of the arab spring. nobody has predicted anything that has happened in the arab world since almost two years now. since that ton esian young man put himself to fire. so here again i think there is an element of unknown. this armed opposition which is making a lot of progress in syria, who are they? who are the groups that are actually doing 9 fighting? you know that there are a lot of defecting soldiers but you have also a lot of civilians and also groups who call themselves fundamentalists. and who are not party of
PBS
Nov 13, 2012 12:00pm PST
call us and apologize to us, too. >> i'm getting fit for nicky. >> patrick, she left, she's gone. >> doc, i have one instinct. i come home from work, i see my wife in the shower, i pull the car pain back -- so, yeah, i snapped. >> hey, tiffany, it's pat, you look nice. >> thank you. >> look, i think you're pretty but i'm not looking. >> neither am i. >> that's confusing, he's dead. >> wait, what's happening? 6- >> what's this i hear about you getting out of the loony bin? >> i thought you said you had it together! you were solid. >> i am solid! i was solid at the game. >> hey! >> what the hell? >> i just wanted to be friends. >> how did you lose your job >> by having sex with everybody in the office. >> serve in >> i was very depressed. >> we don't have to talk about it. how many were there? >> don't let tiffany get you in trouble. >> she's my friend. why would you say that? >> there's this dance thing. i can only do it if i have a partner. >> i'm not going to dance with you. >> is this the girl you wrote about? >> you wrote about me? >> she's my friend with an "f." >> capital "f
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